Villa Amparo Garden Beach Resort, Samal Island

around pilipinas 8

When you’re in Davao and have enough time to bask in the sun, sea, and sand, make a quick trip to Samal Island and ask locals about Villa Amparo.  It’s arguably one of the most scenic and tranquil beach resorts on the island.

It’s about 20 minutes away from Babak Wharf, which means a quiet refuge from the more-populated beaches in Samal.  If you don’t have a private vehicle, you get there by a motorcycle or a tricycle once you reach Babak Wharf.

It’s going to be a bumpy ride so brace yourself.  The road going there is not yet fully developed.

The first time I went there with friends some two years ago, we thought we were being kidnapped because the road was getting narrower and farther from civilization, lol! We could see more trees and hills than the coastline.  And when the driver finally said we have reached our destination, we were welcomed by the resort’s security guard with a gun visibly hoisted to his side.

But seriously, there was nothing to fear there.  In fact, Samal Island as a whole boasts of a low crime rate and is arguably one of the safest places to visit and live in the Philippines.

All of Villa Amparo’s staff from the guard to the kitchen and office personnel were very accommodating.  Since it was a lean season, we had the place to ourselves!  Serenity.

We rented a nipa hut that could accommodate 3-4 people for only P750.  In the morning, we had our breakfast served at the Islet Gazebo without additional charges. Guests would have to pay P600 for a day at the Islet Gazebo but then again, we had the resort to ourselves and were given excellent perks fit for queens.

Their food was delicious yet inexpensive.

Their common shower rooms and restrooms were clean and well-maintained, and that was of primary importance to me.

Overall, Villa Amparo is worth checking out when you’re in Samal.

Tip: Don’t go there after a night of heavy rain because the sea’s current would wash loads of trash from Davao to this side of Samal. Go there on sunny days and enjoy the clear waters of Villa Amparo throughout your stay!

How to get there from Davao City:

By bus:

1. Ride the Island City Express bus from the Magsaysay Park in Uyanguren. This will get you to Sasa Wharf and ferry you to Babak. Get off at Babak Wharf, not in Caliclic. (Around 15 minutes sea travel from Sasa Wharf)

Fare: P30

2. Ride a tricycle or a motorcycle just a few steps away from Babak Wharf. About 20-30 minutes ride from there to Villa Amparo.

Fare: P75-P100 per head on motorcycle or P375-P500 for a tricycle depending on your bargaining skills;

Some habal-habal (motorcycle) drivers may offer P200 per ride, but able to accommodate three passengers at a time. Jaw drop 😉

By private vehicle or taxi:

1. Pay P270 at Sasa Wharf (not sure if rate has changed).

From the Babak Wharf, turn left and be on the lookout for small billboards and road signs along the way that will help you get to Villa Amparo. If all else fails, stop and ask locals.

Address: Sitio Dasag, Barangay Camudmud, Island Garden City of Samal.

The resort is pretty secluded from the other beaches in Babak Samal but when you get there, the breath-taking views, good food and customer service will let you know it’s all worth it.

around pilipinas 9
A comfortable overnight stay in a Villa Amparo nipa hut only costs P750.
around pilipinas 10
Boardwalk gazebo (P800 day tour). Take the spot upstairs for a fantastic view of the beach.

Our stay there was so relaxing and fun, and yet we didn’t break the bank. That’s the reason I went back last year and looking forward to going there again with more friends to tag along.

Debunking Myths about Mindanao

If you haven’t been to any parts of Mindanao, you’re probably one of the people who cringe at the thought of going there. I don’t blame you. Mindanao is generally and unfairly portrayed in the media as a war-torn island where gunshots are as common as firecrackers on Christmas and New Year’s eve.

I’ll tell you a story:

Many years ago, I was walking along a dimly-lit street in Pasay City when a stranger started taking my pace and tried to spark a conversation. I had this gut feeling that his intentions weren’t wholesome and I certainly wished he’d leave me alone. And then he asked me where I came from: I said briefly: “Mindanao.” “Ha? Muslim ka?” (You’re a Muslim?) His startled reaction was overrated. And he scampered away.

What is it about Mindanao and Muslims that scare people? Myths. Unfair generalizations based on hearsay instead of facts.

Once and for all, let’s settle this.

1. Mindanao, which is the second largest island in the country composed of 26 provinces, is generally peaceful.  Only a small fraction of Mindanao is actually conflict-prone. Not even all of Cotabato (North or South) is risky, so to be scared of Cotabato as a whole is not quite fair. However, you might want to avoid Mamasapano in Cotabato at this point. This agricultural area was unfortunately put in a bad light after a bloody encounter between armed groups and our law enforcers last January. Monitor the news first before you decide to visit that area.

But then again, it is but a small area in Mindanao. According to Wikipedia, the island of Mindanao is larger than 125 countries worldwide, including the Netherlands, Austria, Portugal, Czech Republic, Hungary, and Ireland.

2. Whenever Mindanao is mentioned, one top-of-mind association is “Muslims.” First off, Mindanao is not limited to the ARMM or the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (Basilan, Lanao del Sur, Maguindanao, Sulu, Tawi-Tawi) which are predominantly Muslim areas.

There are many other cities and provinces in Mindanao that are dominated by non-Muslims.  And even if there are many Muslims in some parts of Mindanao, so what? They are like everyone else, regardless of religion. Sadly, many of us have ingrained a certain degree of prejudice against our Muslim brothers and sisters as if they’re synonymous to terrorists and rebels. They’re not. I have Muslim friends and they are some of the nicest and most peace-loving people I know on earth. It’s not fair to brand people.

3. Modern Muslims and Christians are not the only dwellers in Mindanao. Mindanao is also home to lumads (indigenous people) who have distinctively rich cultures but are usually not under the media radar (except maybe during the Kadayawan Festival in Davao City where a lot of these lumads converge and participate in government-initiated activities). Filipinas Heritage Library lists these lumads as follows:

  • South Central Mindanao (esp. Davao, Bukidnon, Cotabato): Bagobo, Tagakaolo, Teduray, Manobo, Kulaman, Blaan, T’boli
  • Eastern Mindanao (esp. Agusan, Bukidnon, Davao, Surigao): Mandaya, Ata, Mansaka, Dibabawon
  • North Central Mindanao (esp. Bukidnon): Bukidnon/Higaonon
  • Western Mindanao and the Sulu Islands (esp. Zamboanga, Cotabato, Lanao): Maguindanao, Iranun, Maranao, Tausug, Samal, Yakan, Kalibugan, and Subanen

I am a child of Mindanao and for more than three decades, I have never felt that my safety has been compromised. Was I just lucky? Not sure about that.  I’ve been to parts of Cotabato and Comval Province, places they tag as rebel-infested and war-torn, but I never heard gun shots nor have I been robbed nor assaulted.  There was a single instance though when our group was approached by a member of the New People’s Army somewhere in Compostela Valley but he didn’t bother us, maybe because our guide was a local farmer whom the group respected for creating livelihood in their area.

Still scared of Mindanao? Start with Southern Mindanao particularly Davao City, the 4th Safest City in the World with a crime index of 13.27 and safety index of 86.73.

Experience not strife but the serenity of its nature parks and mountain resorts, the beauty of nearby beaches, the modern facilities around the city, the abundance of seafood, meat and other fresh produce, the diversity and unity of cultures, the hospitality of its people, the honesty of its taxi drivers. Before you know it, you’ll be wanting to visit nearby provinces and telling your friends that their perception of Mindanao being scary is not at all true. around pilipinas